170213 Twenty Questions: Creative Exercise

She talks about da Vinci and his ability to observe and question so many aspects of his current issue of interest.

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On page 176 of The Creative Habit: Learn It and Use It for Life, Tharp encourages people to be thorough.  She talks about da Vinci and his ability to observe and question so many aspects of his current issue of interest.  Tharp invites us to write down twenty questions that we have about a topic before beginning an investigation.  She says whether you are preparing for anything…from a drawing or to a film and more forming questions can help you to cultivate a sense of purpose and understanding.  I think it can also maybe help me to engage with my own mind about what it wants, or to challenge me to think more deeply.

The first challenge I see is to decide what I am interested in writing twenty questions about.  I feel there needs to be some sort of exercise to get me to a place where I’m ready for this exercise.  Since that is not provided I will have to try to sort this out myself…So at this point you may want to scroll down a ways to where I’m over this hump, move on to a different post or join my pain as I contemplate some possible topics:

Possible topics…  book I want to write about (sleep, water, two worlds)

spin dance study… ok that was easier than I thought, I am actually really interested in both those avenues and that took me less than 5 minutes to think up.

I will choose the Book for twenty questions to get me started into the creative process

  1. What will you name the sleep side?
  2. How will you identify the villains?
  3. What have they done that is so heinous?
  4. Will there be elements that braid the two worlds together?
  5. What can pass through the layer? Why?
  6. Is there a limit on extra senses for the sleep world?
  7. Is each person the only one with that ability or can it be held by multiple people or are some traits singular and others more mundane and wide spread?
  8. How can sleep be stolen?  Water?
  9. How can this be made more relevant and relatable to today’s world?
  10. Is there are more important factor that should be addressed instead?
  11. What is the main goal of the protagonists?
  12. What is the main goal of the antagonists?
  13. Is there a middle ground?
  14. Do we at times get to see things from both perspectives?
  15. Do we get personal with both sides?
  16. What kinds of messages should be sent?
  17. How soon are duel personalities revealed..if ever?
  18. Which characters are aware of their flip side presence?
  19. How do I make sure it isn’t cheesy?
  20. HOw do I make it realistic?

In a way I like this idea of presenting questions, but then in a way it is overwhelming too.  As I pile up the questions before me that need to be answered I feel further from my goal because I see more to do.  I guess it is also a starting point and I can try to tackle something once it has been named.  Perhaps on another day I can use my creative time to start to design possible solutions to some of these questions. This exercise took me 20-40 minutes.

2 thoughts on “170213 Twenty Questions: Creative Exercise

  1. I was impressed with your questions. I can see how each one requires much more deliberation= time/effort. On the other hand, we used to teach our students that well thought out questions are more likely to lead to workable solutions. In a fairly short time you’ve generated a good framework for a novel. That makes it more “doable”. Now your mind has fodder for percolating ideas. It will be interesting to see how progress on various questions may affect each other. Fun project.

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